Evidence based practice, why are we so bothered?

With myself and Emily currently completing our Master’s in Education and Ben having already completed his, our research is often at the forefront of our minds.  As an advocate for evidence based practice I have found I have focused much of my writing around this topic.

About 18 months ago I read an article by Ben Goldacre ‘Building Evidence into Education’. Goldacre raised a very valid point, professions such as medicine, nursing and midwifery see evidence as integral in providing the best outcomes for their patients as well as continuing CPD. Not only is this argument both popular but academic as well. Therefore why are we, professional teachers, not engaging with this practice and using evidence to improve the outcome of our pupils?

So, what exactly is evidence based practice?

Evidence based practice is using current literature and the available evidence to make decisions about our teaching practice and to inform policy making. Obviously evidence can take different forms and evidence used in the medical profession will be different to that used in education, but applying the principle of sourcing evidence, evaluating it, applying it and using it to further inform practice is something the teaching profession should be looking to achieve. In short, teachers should be using the literature that is out there and applying it to their own classroom practices and then evaluating the effect.

How did this impact my Master’s research?

Ben, Emily and I set up a journal club to encourage colleagues to engage with current literature. The club runs every half term and we discuss the latest research article, provided by ourselves, and how this can impact on our teaching. We often focus on a research questions and critically analyse this as a group of professionals.

As part of my Master’s research I decided to analyse the impact journal club has as a mechanism for teachers to engage with evidence based practice. From my findings there was an overwhelming agreement from staff that they felt education should be evidence based and that journal club could have a positive impact on engagement, however many teachers do not attend. I also identified that teachers see the value evidence has for the development of their practice and engagement was talked about as being ‘forward thinking’. This frustrated me somewhat as although the teaching body wanted to move the profession forward to engage with evidence based practice, there are clear barriers in place which leaves teachers unable to engage. What these barriers are I am currently researching as part of my dissertation. I hope to disseminate these barriers and discover how we can work towards this culture in time for the next academic year.

Martha Boyne

References:

 

Biesta. G. (2007) ‘Why ‘What Works’ Won’t Work: Evidence Based Practice and the Democratic Deficit in Educational Research’. Educational Theory 57:1

Boyne, M. and Beadle, H. (in press).  Journal Club: A mechanism for bringing evidence based practice into school. Teacher Education Advancement Network (TEAN) Journal, [forthcoming].

Goldacre.B. (2013) Building Evidence into Education. Department for Education

can be accessed here:

http://www.badscience.net/2013/03/heres-my-paper-on-evidence-and-teaching-for-the-education-minister/